Prof. Maryanne Horowitz     horowitz@oxy.edu (email fastest communication), phone 323-259-2583 useful during office hours. 

Office is Swan 314 facing the campus entrance fountain.

Office Hours Fall 2017:  Tues.  8:30-9:30 a.m. Thurs.  8-9:50 a.m. and by appointment

Courses Fall 2017

Hist. 121 Antiquity to 1700: Europe and the Middle East    Pre-1800 and Global       

Section 1 10:05-11:30 a.m. Tues, Thurs.               Section 2          1:30-2:55 p.m. Tues, Thurs.

A survey of multiple Western civilizations and their interrelationships. Among ancients, we shall study Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks, and Romans. In medieval times, we shall examine Catholic Europe, Greek Orthodox Byzantium, Islamic Civilization, and their interrelationships. We shall consider the treatment of women and of minorities, and shall highlight travelers between civilizations. We shall conclude with the European Renaissance and Reformation, Turkish hegemony in the Eastern Mediterranean, and the shift in trade from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic Ocean as modern science and enlightenment challenge traditional civilizations.

 

Courses Spring 2018

Hist. 226 Early Modern Origin of Human Rights    Pre-1800 and Global                          Eligible for credit in History & Classical Studies.

10:40-11:35 MWF  Pre-1800 and Global

A history survey of the 14th-18th centuries: Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Advance, Global Encounters in Spanish and English Empires, the Enlightenment, and Revolutions (English, American, French). The luxury of European palaces was based on the exploitation of European peasants and global indigenous peoples. Students seeking origins of the concept of human rights will consider protest pamphlets, utopian fiction, and enlightenment stories (some with film versions) which created empathy for others.

CSP   Renaissance and Enlightenment Individuals           1l:45 a.m. -12:40 p.m. MWF

Course Description:
Experience the European Renaissance and Enlightenment  through its artistic and scientific innovation, religious reform, and  multivaried personalities. Consider the relationship of contemporary "individuality" to the characteristics of men and women of early modern times. A source reader will provide practice in analyzing texts, as well as objects of material culture, in an age of encounters between cultures. A student may focus on a particular field such as politics/diplomacy, court life, sexuality/gender, crafts and the arts, classical revival, reformation, scientific experiment, mapping the globe, philosophical inquiry, protest literature and salons, or travel and global encounters. Learning collaboratively and discussing two films, students examine the lives of a diversity of men and women and the controversies that their lives provoked. Open only to first year frosh.

 

Hist. 220 Ancient Athens and Renaissance Florence   Pre-1800 and Regional   Eligible for History & Classical Studies & GWSS credit.

1:55-2:50 p.m. MWF

Ancient Athens and Renaissance Florence. This course provides an opportunity to vicariously "live" in historical cities considered to be creators of democratic or representative forms of government as well as of great literature and art. Historian Thucydides, comic Aristophanes, and philosopher Plato draw us into Athenian gender/class socialization, politics, and culture; likewise, Boccaccio, the Medici family, and Machiavelli inform us of Florentine gender/class socialization, politics, and culture. Monumental architecture and gendered sculpture continue to serve to decorate and sustain the individuality of each city. By examining documents of daily life (including court cases concerning sexual acts) and the luxury products of the diverse crafts, we increase our knowledge of the controversial behavior and productivity of a wide spectrum of women and men. By focusing on two cities in their "golden age," the class will emphasize the shared positive, as well as negative, characteristics of ages historians have designated as "golden." (May be taken as History 397, by writing a research paper in place of one class paper.)

Previous Years...............................................

Fall 2016

CSP 14 Becoming a Multi-varied Individual  

Discuss how to become a multi-varied individual while learning about people who experienced either the European Renaissance or the Enlightenment of the 14th through 18th centuries. That was a period of artistic and scientific innovation, religious reform, classical revival, and politics of global encounter. Consider the relationship of contemporary "individuality" to the characteristics of men and women of early modern times. Two films with memorable lead characters will be The Return of Martin Guerre and Belle. Learning collaboratively, students examine the lives of a diversity of men and women and the controversies their lives provoked. Open only to first year frosh.

 

CSP 14 2  Same description    12:50-1:45  MWF

Hist. 223 Rise of French Culture   8:00-9:25 a.m. M & W

History of France and of French creativity in literature and in the visual arts from the High Middle Ages to the age of Enlightenment (12th to 18th centuries).   CORE Regional, Pre-1800.  Eligible for History, Classical Studies, or elective in French culture concentration.  History majors may petition for 397-level credit for this class with the completion of additional work arranged with the instructor. 

Spring 2017

History 121 Antiquity to 1700: Europe and the Middle East  (Enrolled may see it on MOODLE)

T. Th. 1:30-2:55 p.m. Section 1

A survey of multiple Western civilizations and their interrelationships. Among ancients, we shall study Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews, Persians, Greeks, and Romans. In medieval times, we shall examine Catholic Europe, Greek Orthodox Byzantium, Islamic Civilization, and their interrelationships. We shall consider the treatment of women and of minorities, and shall highlight travelers between civilizations. We shall conclude with the European Renaissance and Reformation, Turkish hegemony in the Eastern Mediterranean, and the shift in trade from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic Ocean as modern science and enlightenment challenge traditional civilizations.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: PRE-1800, and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and INTERCULTURAL   History & Classical Studies course

History 237 History of Feminism T, Th. 10:00-11:25 a.m. CORE Global Connections, Intercultural.   WGSS Minor

This course will trace the development of feminism in Europe and the United States and will consider policy issues in applications of feminism in contemporary American law and within the global human rights movement. In early modern times, popular conceptualizations of the intersection of gender, ethnicity, and class divided women from each other just as feminism emerged from a debate on woman’s nature to a debate on opportunities for women: to be educated, to write, to speak out, to preach, to express one’s individuality in dress and demeanor, to work in one’s chosen occupation. For the transformation in political theory from Lockean family representation to Suffragette individual representation in the state, we shall explore the literature on “rights” from Wollstonecraft to United Nations declarations on Women’s Rights. Participating in contemporary feminism, students will debate alternative viewpoints on issues such as abortion, violence against women, and discrimination; and we shall also experience together a diversity of feminist films.  

 Spring 2016

History 224  Marco Polo to Machiavelli: The Italian Renaissance & Exploration, 

 Monday/Wednesday/Friday 1:55–2:50pm  Weingart 116

This course offers a chance to come to know a variety of individuals who lived in and travelled from the Italian peninsula in the 1300s, 1400s, and 1500s. We shall journey to the Far East with Marco Polo, meet peoples of the Mediterranean, and "visit" the republics of Venice and Florence, the papal court of Rome, and the ducal courts of Urbino and Mantua. We shall enjoy distinctive creations in literature, education, philosophy, and the arts, and read letters about S. American peoples from Amerigo Vespucci. Diplomat Machiavelli witnessed independent Italian city-states fall to French and Habsburg conquests and described such realistic politics; courtesan Veronica Franco successfully practiced her sexual trade while writing poems celebrating her true love as well as her mercantile city-state. Students may petition for 300-level credit for this class with the completion of additional work arranged with the instructor. 
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: PRE-1800 and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and INTERCULTURAL  History & Classical Studies course Students may petition for 300-level credit for this class with the completion of additional work arranged with the instructor. 

 

 

 History 300. Re-assessing European Global Encounters

 

Monday/Wednesday 8:00 – 9:25am. Fowler 110 (a computer room for writing/research workshops using sources at class electronic reserves)

The 20th-century national movements of liberation from European colonialism initiated re-assessments of the Crusades, trade on the Silk Road, piracy and kidnapping, as well as of the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, English, and French trade routes and settlements on the Atlantic and Pacific Rims in the early modern period. Each student will be writing a historiographical essay revealing changing interpretations of one global encounter. Class work will enhance student skills: we shall be discussing exemplary recent historical films and histories, and we shall learn how to efficiently find diverse viewpoints through on-line and printed sources.   Open to majors and minors, or may enroll with instructor's approval.  CORE REQUIREMENT MET: PRE-1800 and GLOBAL CONNECTIONS and INTERCULTURAL 

History 121 Antiquity to 1700: Europe and the Middle East 

2-credit course on theme of Exhibitions for Interns at Autry Museum of the American West.

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Courses 14 - 15

Hist. 224 Marco Polo to Machiavelli: The Italian Renaissance & Exploration          CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Global Connections (CPGC)● PRE-1800. History Dept: Intercultural and pre-1800; Classical Studies

Students may petition for 300-level credit for this class with the completion of additional work arranged with the instructor.

9:35-10:30 M, W, F  Johnson 105. 

History 226 Age of Encounters     CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Global Connections (CPGC)● PRE-1800 History Department Inter-cultural and pre-1800; Classical Studies.

As the early modern network of trade shifted from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic Ocean, the Portuguese, the Spanish, the French, the Dutch, and the English competed for trade and for colonization of peoples newly encountered. We shall evaluate Renaissance arts and letters, traveler reports and images of peoples of South America, and Protestant Christianity and the Catholic Counter-Reformation with subsequent competition among missionaries and European states for converts around the globe. We shall discuss amusing short satires by the most famous Northern humanist and humorist Erasmus, protester of cruelty Las Casas, and empirical scientist Bacon's scientific utopia New Atlantis, Montaigne’s “On Cannibals,”  and Campanella’s City of the Sun in the context of travelogues and island utopias. Students may petition for 300-level credit for this class with the completion of additional work arranged with the instructor.

1:55-2:50 M,W,F   Fowler 110        

CSP 67 Renaissance Individuals   11:45 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Johnson 203

 History 121.  Antiquity to 1700: Europe and the Middle East.     CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Global Connections (CPGC) ● PRE-1800

1:30-2:55 Tues, Thurs.    History Dept. Survey and pre-1800.

History 220. Ancient Athens and Renaissance Florence.    CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Regional Focus  (CPRF) ● PRE-1800

10:05-11:30 Tues, Thurs.     History Dept. Survey and pre-1800.

Spring 2014

Hist. 224  The Italian Renaissance CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Regional Focus (CPRF) ● PRE-1800

Hist. 226 Age of Encounters CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Global Connections (CPGC)● PRE-1800 History Department Inter-cultural and pre-1800; Classical Studies.

CSP 57 Renaissance Individuals  11:45 a.m.-12:40 p.m. Library 355

Fall 2013 (same courses Fall 2014)

Hist 121 Europe and the Middle East to 1700. CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Global Connections (CPGC) ● PRE-1800

1:30-2:55 Tues, Thurs. in Fowler 111    History Dept. Survey and pre-1800.

Hist 220 Ancient Athens and Renaissance Florence CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: Regional Focus  (CPRF) ● PRE-1800

10:05-11:30 Tues, Thurs. in Weingart 210     History Dept. Survey and pre-1800. WSGS

Spring 2013   History 200-level courses may be taken as Hist. 397 by adding a Research Paper.

Hist. 224 The Italian Renaissance CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: EUROPE ● PRE-1800   10:40-11:35 am  Lib. 355

CSP 68 Seminar on Renaissance Individuals  11:45-12:40  Library 355

Experience the expanding global culture of Europe in the 14th-18th centuries, an age of religious reform and of exploration.  A book of almost 100 concise biographies—Renaissance People: Lives that Shaped the Modern Worldintroduces students to the daily lives of a diversity of men and women and the controversies their lives provoked. Films will highlight the multi-varied individual, like the courtesan and poet Veronica Franco, as well as the confrontation between artist Michelangelo and military pope Julius II.  A source reader will provide practice in analyzing texts, as well as objects of material culture, in an age of encounters between cultures.  For a research-based essay utilizing evidence from the times, each student will focus on two individuals in a field of the student’s interest such as politics/diplomacy; court life; sexuality/gender; crafts and the arts; reformation in religion; scientific experiment and enlightenment; mapping the globe;  or travel and encounter.  Together students will share the evidence upon which scholars re-interpret the past to meet concerns of our present world.

Hist. 226 Age of Encounters CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: INTERCULTURAL ● PRE-1800  1:55-2:50 p.m. Weingart 210

397 - Independent Study in History (for 300-level credit for 200-level courses or for starting a comprehensive project for 2013-14)  Reading tutorials, off-campus internships, and research projects are among options available. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
2 or 4 units

Fall 2012

History 121 Europe to 1700 Core:  Europe & Pre-1800. Eligible for History & Classical Studies.  10:05-11:30 a.m. Introduction to the history of European peoples from the ancient Greek city-states to the Enlightenment. The course will focus on major centers of civilization, and on influential thinkers and political leaders who transformed their societies, and will cover Hellenic, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures, the Medieval period, the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Age of Reason.   

History 220  Ancient Athens and Renaissance Florence  Europe & Pre-1800. Eligible for History & Classical Studies. (may be taken as History 399, by adding research paper)   1:30-2:55 p.m.  This course provides an opportunity to vicariously "live" in historical cities considered to be creators of democratic or representative forms of government as well as of great literature and art. Historian Thucydides, comic Aristophanes, and philosopher Plato draw us into Athenian politics and culture; likewise, Lorenzo de' Medici and Machiavelli inform us of Florentine politics and culture. Monumental architecture and sculpture continue to serve to decorate and sustain the individuality of each city. By examining documents of daily life (including court cases) and the luxury products of the diverse crafts, we increase our knowledge of the controversial behavior and productivity of a wide spectrum of women and men. By focusing on two cities in their "golden age," the class will emphasize the shared positive, as well as negative, characteristics of ages historians have designated as "golden." Students may petition for 300-level credit for this class with the completion of additional work arranged with the instructor.
CORE REQUIREMENTS MET: EUROPE ● PRE-1800

Hist. 397

Spring 2012

Hist. 121 Europe to 1700 Core:: GROUP 3 Europe• PRE-1800 Eligible for History, Classical Studies.

Section 1 8:30-9:25 am.   Section 2 9:30-10:25 a.m. 

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Spring 2011

Hist. 121 Europe to 1700, section 1 10:30-11:25 am, Johnson 101; section 2 11:30am -12:25pm Johnson 204   Core:: GROUP 3 Europe• PRE-1800 Eligible for History, Classical Studies.

Hist. 324  The Italian Renaissance   Core:: GROUP 3 Europe• PRE-1800 Eligible for History, Classical Studies    A history of the Italian peninsula in the 1300s, 1400s, and 1500s. Venice, Florence,  Rome, Urbino, and Mantua will receive special attention. We shall take a close look at the distinctive creations in art, literature, education, and philosophy among men and women of letters. Marriage vs. clerical celibacy, sexualities, and family life are among the topics. Classical studies topics assess the extent of the impact of ancient objects and texts on individual Renaissance contributions to government, literature, philosophy, or the arts.   

Fall 2010

History 223  8:30-9:55 T, Th  The Rise of French Culture Core:: GROUP 3 Europe• PRE-1800 Eligible for History, Classical Studies, or elective in French culture concentration. History of France and of French creativity in literature and in the visual arts from the High Middle Ages to the age of Enlightenment (12th to 18th centuries).

Hist. 326 10:00-11:25 T, Th. The Age of the European Renaissance.  Core:  GROUP 3 Europe & Pre-1800; History or Classical Studies. A history of the spread of the Renaissance throughout Europe from the invention of printing in the 1450s through the 1650s when scientists challenged Renaissance educational curricula. The early modern network of trade fueled the economies of states with Atlantic Ocean ports and overseas colonies. We shall examine key rulers and their governing courts of Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, France, England, and the Papacy. We shall study the development of Protestant Christianity and the emergence of movements for representative government in Flemish and Dutch cities. Reading of Machiavelli, Erasmus, Campanella, and Bacon.  Classical Studies assesses the extent of the impact of ancient objects and texts on individual Northern Renaissance contributions to government, literature, philosophy, or the arts. 

Spring 2010

Hist. 324 The Italian Renaissance, MWF 11:30-12:25  Johnson 205 Core:: GROUP 3 • PRE-1800  Eligible for History or Classical Studies.

Hist 223 Rise of French Culture MW 8:00-9:25 a.m. Johnson 204

Hist. 237 History of Feminism MWF   9:30-10:25 a.m.  Johnson 209   Core:  INTERCULTURAL   

Fall 2009 Courses

History 121, EUROPE TO 1700.  Tues and Thurs. 8:30-9:55 a.m.   Core: Europe & Pre-1800; History or Classical Studies               

Hist. 390 Ancient Athens and Renaissance Florence Research Seminar, Tues and Thurs. 10-11:25 a.m.

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Spring 09 History 221. EUROPE TO 1700       

Spring 09 History 223 RISE OF FRENCH CULTURE   

Spring 09 CSP 61  GENDER AND INTERFAITH DIALOGUE IN WORLD RELIGIONS     

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Fall 2008

Fall 08 History 221   History 221 Europe to 1700

Fall 08 History 326 History 326  The Age of the European Renaissance

Spring 2008

Cultural Studies Program 64 Issues of Gender and Interfaith Dialogue in World Religions 11:30-12:25 MWF

Hist. 221 Europe to 1700  1:30-2:25  M, W, F.

Hist. 324 Italian Renaissance 3:30-4:55, M & W.

Spring Semester, 2007

Hist. 326 Europe, 1450-1715  11:30 a.m -12:25 p.m. MWF  From the invention of the printing press through the Age of Louis XIV, Europe experienced several transforming movements. This course shall show how Reformations, Explorations and Encounters, Scientific Innovation, and Revolutionary Politics transformed European culture from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment.CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GROUP 3 • PRE-1800 Eligible for History or Classical Studies course credits 11:30-12:25  MWF, Johnson  104

Hist. 223 Rise of French Culture  1:30-2:25 p.m MWF  , Classics, or elective in French culture concentration.  1:30-2:25 MWF Johnson 104

WSGS 237 Contemporary Feminist Thought 2:30-5:25 Mon., Johnson 204

This course will study the multiple movements of contemporary feminism.  Through experiencing a diversity of feminist films, as well as texts on feminist issues, students will evaluate how the feminist movement is transforming gender roles and expectations here and abroad.

CORE Intercultural. Eligible for WSGS or History credit

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Fall Semester, 2006

Hist. 221 Europe to 1700 10-11:25 am Tues, Thurs. History or Classical Studies

Syllabus Hist 221 Fall 06

Introduction to the history of European peoples from the ancient Greek city-states to the Enlightenment. The course will focus on major centers of civilization, and on influential thinkers and political leaders who transformed their societies, and will cover Hellenic, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures, the Medieval period, the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, and the Age of Reason. Eligible for Classical Studies credit.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GROUP 3 • PRE-1800

Hist. 324 Italian Renaissance 8:30-9:55  Eligible for History, Classical Studies or WSGS course credits. A history of the Italian peninsula in the 1300s, 1400s, and 1500s. Florence, Venice, Rome, Urbino, and Mantua will receive special attention. We shall take a close look at the distinctive creations in art, literature, education, and philosophy among men and women of letters. Marriage vs. clerical celibacy, sexualities, and family life are among the Women’s Studies/Gender Studies topics. Classical studies topics assess the extent of the impact of ancient objects and texts on individual Renaissance contributions to government, literature, philosophy, or the arts.
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GROUP 3 • PRE-1800

Spring 2005

History 224 "Museums: Origins, Transformations, and Contemporary Issues" 2:30-5:25 M

Open Enrollment, fulfills Core requirement 6: Intercultural.

Core Seminar 57 on Controversial Lives, M,W, F. Section at 11:30, Section at 1:30 Frosh only.

Fall 2005

Hist. 221 Europe to 1700 T, Th 10-11:25  

Horowitz
CORE REQUIREMENT MET: GROUP 3 • PRE-1800  

Hist. 320 Ancient Athens T, Th 8:30-9:55 Fulfills CORE pre-1800 and  3 in Europe; Classical Studies, WSGS Studies, as well as Upper Division course for History Major.A study of Athenian politics, society, and culture in the 5th, 4th, and 3rd centuries BCE. We shall experience ancient approaches to history, theater, poetry, philosophy, science and religion. We come to appreciate Hellenic and Hellenistic architecture and sculpture, and the later archaeological search for such treasures. We try to attend the schools: Plato’s Academy, Aristotle’s Lyceum, Zeno’s Stoa, and Epicurus’ Garden.

Spring 2005

History 300 - New Approaches to "Renaissance" or "Early Modern" M 2:30-5:25    Meets pre-1800 requirement.
 Students will receive guidance in the steps of writing a historiographical paper.  For example, students might consider and evaluate several scholars' viewpoints on such issues as colonial encounters; social construction by gender and rank; worker rebellions or confraternity rituals; connoisseurship and collecting; regional/national variations in carnivals, popular dance, humanism, or court culture; or communication of scientific or religious ideas through visual, oral, and participatory processes, as well as by texts. 

WSGS 237  Contemporary Feminism  T Th  8:30-9:55 am   Hist majors/minors may apply this course to hist credit. 

Hist.  320      Ancient Athens  T Th 1:30-2:55 p.m.

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Fall 2004  

Hist. 221 Europe to 1700 T, Th 10-11:25  

Hist. 324 Renaissance Culture and Society  T Th 3-4:25 A 21st century approach to "the renaissance of arts and letters" which began in Florence in the 14th century and spread throughout Europe from the 15th through the early 17th century. The course will extend from citystate planning among the Italians  to nation-state building during the age of Shakespeare.  We shall explore the political history and political philosophies of the city-states and nation-states, as well as humanist education and thought among men and women of letters.  Students shall evaluate evidence of the impact of the colonial encounters. Each student will write a research paper on a topic of personal choice.

   SPRING 2004

Vocations and Women’s Meaningful Work       WSGS 301 CORE 6 No prerequisites, open to ALL students, a special Lilly Endowment course

http://www.oxy.edu/grants/lilly/academic.htm

M, W 3:30-4:55

Exploration of a variety of viewpoints on women’s vocations across a spectrum of Jewish, Catholic, and Protestant cultures.  A consideration of transformations in the concept “vocation” accompanying the opening of ministerial and rabbinical posts to women. Future vocations for women with reference to feminist legislation in the United States, European Union, and the United Nations.  Opportunity to participate in a community-based learning group project or to do individual career-oriented research on vocation. Women’s leadership in the professions, business, government, family, and philanthropic institutions.

 History 221  Europe to 1700    Eligible for European and Pre-Modern Core Credit MWF 10:30-11:25 a.m. Spots in 35-person course saved for lst year students.

History 324: Renaissance Culture and Society T, Th 3:00-4:25 p.m.  Johnson 311.     

A lecture course with discussion. Students will write essay examinations and a 10-page research paper on any aspect of the European Renaissance. This course meets Hist Dept. and Core Pre-1800, Core 3. For Hist Majors or Minors, it meets either survey requirement (for those who haven't had a European history course) or upperdivision requirement.

Women Studies/Gender Studies 237: Contemporary Feminism 
  
T, Th. 10:00 -11:25 a.m. Weingart 209  (Credit in WS/GS or Hist. and also CORE 6)  

Students will discuss and debate issues, follow up with two five-page papers on public issues of personal concern, and write two essay exams.

History 300: Museums and Art of Collection - The modern museum originates in the early modern passion for collecting. We shall study the emergence of libraries, palace curiosity cabinets, and university botanical gardens, while visiting major museums, gardens, and libraries of Los Angeles. Each student may follow his or her own geographical and disciplinary interests in writing a research paper on the history and design of a collection.       Additionally, 2 credit Internships in neighboring museums may be arranged.

History 221:  Europe to 1700     

Spring 2002

History 236/Women Studies: Herstory:  Women in Western Culture T R 10:00-11:25, Johnson 104. A feminist perspective on European history from ancient through early modern times, tracing the fluidity of socially constructed gender roles. We shall evaluate the primary source evidence on women's condition in ancient Greece and Rome and in early modern Europe, and shall consider the changing issues of the debate about women to the present.

History 300:  History of Ideas  W 1:30-4:25 p.m., N. Swan 200. This seminar will focus on modern and contemporary ideas, controversies, and movements in historical context.  As a class, we shall examine controversies on freedom of speech and expression and on gender equity. We shall consider how new ideas transform the process of gaining and classifying knowledge. As intellectual and cultural historians working on a research paper of their choice, students may consider intellectual traditions, cultural centers and institutions, or movements that generated controversies, theories or methods. Models for writing include the Journal of the History of Ideas and the reference works Dictionary of the History of Ideas and Encyclopedia of American Cultural & Intellectual History.

History 324: Renaissance Culture and Society 

Fall 2001

History 221:  Europe to 1700   

Cultural Studies Program 15:   Ideas of Education     From ancient Socratic dialogue with one's neighbors to modern study-abroad programs for global understanding, we shall explore alternative philosophies of the liberally educated  individual. MWF  11:30-12:25

Spring 2001

History 300: Museums and Art of Collection

Fall 2000

History 326: Reformation and Revolution
- This course explores the dilemmas of those seeking to reform society without causing a revolution. In Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries, moderate and radical Protestants split from the Catholic Church and the English fought other English in a bloody revolution. In encountering diverse peoples on the globe and in developing scientific modes of thought, Europeans ushered in a knowledge revolution. The pre-Enlightenment period witnessed the emergence of a modern political philosophy supporting representative government and a secular scientific worldview challenging to religion

Women Studies/Gender Studies 237: Contemporary Feminism and Feminist Scholarship

Spring 2000

History 236/Women Studies: Herstory:  Women in Western Culture
 

Culture Studies Seminar on Education and the Good Life from Renaissance Through Enlightenment - An opportunity to enter into the culture of Europe during the ages of the Renaissance and Enlightenment. Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Gentilleschi, Bernini, Turner, and Poussin. Christine de Pizan, Machiavelli, Castiglione, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Wollstonecraft. These are among the artists and writers of the 15th through 18th centuries whom you will meet. The goal is to improve your thinking and writing skills on subjects overlapping the humanities, social science, and fine arts. 

Fall 1999

History 234: Renaissance Culture and Society  

History 236/Women Studies: Herstory:  Women in Western Culture

Spring 1999

History 380: Ideas of Good Life
- An exploration of European debates on the good life from antiquity through the nineteenth centuries. The course teaches research skills in the methods of the history of ideas (especially political and moral philosophy)

Fall 1998

History 326: Reformation and Revolution

Culture Studies Seminar: Ideas of Education- From ancient Socratic dialogue with one's neighbors to modern study-abroad programs for global understanding, we shall explore alternative philosophies of the liberally educated individual

History 300: The Art of Collecting

Spring 1998

Cities in European Culture - A history of the role of urban centers in the creation of European culture. Particular attention will be paid to literature, documents, and images from Athens 500-250 B.C.E., Rome 100 B.C.E.-100 C.E., Paris 1050-1350, and Florence 1300-1530

Fall 08 History 326

Fall 08 History 221